How much should I feed my Flemish Giant Rabbit?

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What should a Flemish Giant Rabbit eat? They’re huge and contrary to popular belief they do need a lot more food than your average house bun. Your Flemish Giant will require a balanced diet of Hay, Fruit, Veggies and Pellets.

But how many pellets does your Flemish Giant need?

The basics of a rabbits diet

Around 80% of your rabbits diet should be hay, as they are grazing animals they should have an unlimited suppy of fresh hay constantly. For the most part, your rabbit should eat grass hays, there are a few brands that this falls under: Timothy Hay, Orchard Grass, Oat Hay and Brome hay.

It doesn’t matter if you want to mix this up and have multiple hays in one pile or just give your furry friend a single type. We give Link multiple types of hay to spoil him.

Alfalfa hay is not great for adult rabbits as this is legume and not grass. This means that it is too rich to have regularly. It’s not a problem to give your rabbit a little alfalfa as a treat though!

How many pellets should I give my Flemish Giant?

Wagg Rabbit Pellets
Testing Wagg Twitch Rabbit Pellets

This depends purely on how much your rabbit weighs, as your Flemish Giant will be larger than the average rabbit, finding the relevant information can be difficult.

Your Flemish Giant as an adult will want 1 quarter cup of Timothy Hay pellets a day. If your Flemish Giant is under 1 year old / Under 5lbs, it would need one eighth of a cup of Alfalfa Pellets.

Whilst our rabbit Link isn’t a Flemish Giant, he is a Flemish cross. In most cases you would want to give your adult rabbit a small portion of Timothy Hay base pellets, generall you would not want more than quarter of a standard cup.

As a warning, do not buy your rabbit any pellets which contain dried corn, nuts and seeds, these are considered widly as a choking hazard.

Our Recommended Picks:

Burgess Excel Pellets
4.5/5
Tiny Friends Farm Pellets for Young Rabbits
4.7/5
Tiny Friends Farm - Russel Rabbit
4.4/5
Gi Stasis in Rabbits

Links says!

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What Hay should I give my Flemish Giant?

Having a Flemish Giant doesn’t change the type of hay they should have. At a year old at least, your rabbit should be eating Timothy Hay, you may be able to ween your Flemish Giant onto Timothy Hay earlier, but this should be at discretion of your local vet.

There are a few reccomendations for hay we have tried, some not so good and others our rabbit Link LOVES. Rather than post those we don’t rate highly, check out our recommended Hay selections which have been tried and tested!

Our Recommended Picks:

Alfalfa King
5/5
Friends Farm - Russel Rabbit Hay
5/5
Alfalfa King Double Compressed
4/5

How many vegetables can my Flemish Giant have?

Unfortunately, even though Flemish Giants are a lot larger, they shouldn’t exceed a standard amount of Vegetables and Herbs every day. This typical amount is two cups of fresh vegetables.

If you have a Flemish Giant, you can in theory increase this, however, this can be a bad habbit as the majority of the diet should be hay. With such delicate digestive tracts, it’s easy to do more harm than good by accident.

Don’t feed your rabbit Potatoes, Seeds, Nuts or Beans.

Some Vegetables you can give your rabbit daily are: Bell Peppers, Bok Choy, Carrot Tops, Fennel, Radicchio. Read more on What Vegetables can my rabbit have?

How many treats can I give?

Treats are filled to the brim with sugar and preservatives, which is why you need to be very sparing with your rabbit. Did you know you can make your own healthy snacks? Like freeze-dried fruit and hay cookies. Some other treats can be dried flowers (With some exceptions) and most Oxbrow Branded treats.

We also get our rabbit “Naturals” but choose to avoid specific types of treats, we highly suggest picking the same as our specific tested treats.

Much like you would for yourself, read the back of the packaging and avoid any treats with added preservatives. Not all treats and toys sold in shops are regulated.